Ashburn, VA

Average cost for Granite Countertops ranges from
$50 – $200 /sq. ft.

The average cost for granite countertops is $3,700 for a total installation. Hiring a granite countertop pro, you will likely spend between $50 – $200 per square foot depending on the extent. The price of granite countertops can vary greatly by region (and even by zip code). View our local pros or get free estimates from pros near you.

How much do granite countertops cost?

Author: Sally Hanan
Millions of people ask HomeGuide for cost estimates every year. We track the estimates they get from local companies, then we share those prices with you.

Quality Factors Finish Design Labor Cost Reducing Cost Tips

Granite is formed from hot molten magma whose minerals turn into crystals as the magma cools. These beautiful crystals are much easier to see when the stone is cut or polished. Granite is becoming as expensive as marble countertop, and having it installed will increase the resale value of homes for many owners.

No matter if you are looking to simply give the family kitchen a new updated look, or you are considering moving forward with the sale of your home, this guide will help you understand the costs to expect for the completed work, and the additional options that can also affect the price for your project.

Granite Quality

The quality of the stone, how thick the stone is, the design, and the overall size of the countertops will all affect the bottom line. Finding out the cost per square foot is just the beginning of your pricing journey.

Granite countertops

Overall, expect to pay from $2,400–$5,000 to buy and install your granite countertops in a medium-sized kitchen.

Granite Source

Sourcing granite from within the US will definitely result in a lower cost of materials for your project. Imported granite is roughly 30% more than domestic because of the high shipping costs associated with its weight.

If possible, selecting a local granite company to do the work will likely result in a lower overall investment, since transportation for the granite won’t be an additional line item on your list of expenses, and they’ll offer bundle pricing.

Generally, the nationwide hardware and home improvement chains will have a somewhat limited selection of options to choose from. In addition to that, it is also possible that they won’t have prices as good as those from specialty countertop companies for comparable products.

Granite Quality

When looking at the cost per square foot, cheaper granite countertops are often of a lower quality because they contain a higher percentage of soft materials. More expensive product will look more unique in composition and have patterns that are more visually interesting. The cheaper products will be more likely to develop chips and cracks, meaning you will have to replace them much sooner than a more expensive product.

This factor will be less of a consideration if you are upgrading to sell rather than if you are upgrading the kitchen you will be enjoying as a family for the next 10 to 20 years.

Granite Source

Sourcing granite from within the US will definitely result in a lower cost of materials for your project. Imported granite is roughly 30% more than domestic because of the high shipping costs associated with its weight.

If possible, selecting a local granite company to do the work will likely result in a lower overall investment, since transportation for the granite won’t be an additional line item on your list of expenses, and they’ll offer bundle pricing.

Generally, the nationwide hardware and home improvement chains will have a somewhat limited selection of options to choose from. In addition to that, it is also possible that they won’t have prices as good as those from specialty countertop companies for comparable products.

Granite Thickness | 1 ¼” will cost an average of 25% more

Almost all granite from suppliers in the US comes in one of two standard thickness. The most common has a thickness of 1 ¼” or 3 cm, and the second most common is ¾” or 2cm.

If you choose the ¾” granite slab, it will be a less expensive project overall, but keep it mind it will also look different because it is thinner. Take a look at the different options side-by-side in a showroom before making your decision final.

Granite Color

The colors and patterns that you can see in granite slab countertops come from the presence of the minerals biotite, muscovite, and pyroxene.

  • Biotite is usually either black, brown, or green, depending on the levels of iron also present.
  • Muscovite is quite transparent, but has hints of green, yellow, brown, and rose.
  • Pyroxene is either light or dark green, dark brown, or black.

Look for a company that offers granite in a wide range of colors like Troy Granite in Newark, Delaware. Lighter colors like green, beige, and white are more common and easier to cut. Darker granite will be roughly $10 more per square foot than the lighter shades because of two main reasons: cost and the hardness of the stone.

  • Cost: Less common colors for granite will cost more because they are rare, i.e., purple, blue, and red granite.
  • Hardness: Granite is difficult to scratch with a knife compared to marble, which makes it a really good choice for kitchen countertops. Red and brown granite are typically the harder versions of granite, but it is more difficult to cut and to create the edge finish.

Granite Finish | Approx. $1.50 per square foot

Generally, people will choose from one of three custom finishes on their countertop—from a more muted finish to a high shine.

  • Leather. Created by pushing brushes with diamond tips across the granite surface. It results in a pebble-like textured look which resembles the surface of leather. It will be less porous than regular granite and hides smears, fingerprints, water spots, and food crumbs. Just like honed and polished granite slab, leathered stone will need to be sealed to help prevent the stone pores from stains. Leathering dark-colored granite will show off the texture best and reveal a high-end finish.
  • Honed. Created by pushing brushes with diamond tips across the granite surface, but the polishing wheels are covered with abrasive pads which are stopped before the slab becomes truly polished. The resulting effect gives granite a matte or satin appearance, but it still feels great because it is smooth. Honed granite presents a more natural look than polished stone. This muted finish is subtle and doesn’t allow the color of the granite to come through the same way a polished slab would, unless you add a color enhancer. Because the process leaves the granite more porous than a polished surface, it is recommended that you reseal the surface every few months.
  • Polished. Polished granite is deemed the top of the range, and the most elegant, when it comes to finishes. In addition to the shine and reflective nature the polishing process delivers, there is a richness to the colors that the other processes cannot match. It is the least porous finish, but it does a poor job of masking any imperfections in the stone. Polished granite is super scratch, stain, and bacteria resistant because the process seals the pores of the stone. Even though it takes longer to produce polished granite compared to honed, it’s typically cheaper because its popularity guarantees most vendors will order it in large quantities, which in turn lowers their per unit purchase price from their suppliers.

Design considerations

When thinking about the design for your countertops, the simpler the design, the lower the cost. When complexity is introduced to the design, the cost will spike because of the difficult nature of working with granite. Different levels of complexity include having angles—L-shaped counters, cutouts for sinks, flush mounting a stovetop, or the inclusion of backsplash—versus straight lines from rectangular pieces and having tile as a backsplash behind the sink.

  • Sink Cutouts | Average $100
  • Slab Edge Style | Edging approx. $10/square foot
    • Many fabricators will have the capacity to create various styles of edging for your countertops, but most consumers elect for simple rounded or flat. When requesting quotes, check to see what additional costs are applicable for a different finish when deviating from the standard.

Countertop Installation

Labor Costs

Labor costs will usually equal to the cost of your granite.

With most vendors in the granite countertop space, a standard rule of thumb is that the install cost will typically match the materials cost. That generally doesn’t include edging, sink cutouts, polishing, or backsplash. Depending on where you live, you will have either very few companies qualified to bid to get the work done, or you will have so many it will seem overwhelming.

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Ways to reduce the cost

If you would rather buy the granite slab individually and have someone install it for you, or you only need a small amount, many companies will have a section of their floorspace dedicated to remnant pieces. Sadly, it is unlikely there will be enough remnants of the same type for a full kitchen remodel. There are two other options though.

Tile | 75%–80% less than granite block

Instead of getting a custom piece of granite as your countertop surface, you could select granite tile. Costing between $6–$10, these tiles are created from leftovers of previous cuts from slabs. With slabs running an average of 425 square feet, these cuts from the remnants will result in tiles from 15–30 square feet. To further reduce the cost (marginally), you can have them glued down running flush instead of with the more traditional grout between tiles. Grout will be an additional expense for a tiled granite countertop, and it will cost a little more if you want a color added to the grout to blend in with the color of the granite tiles.

Modular Granite | 33%–45% less than granite block

Modular granite is a larger leftover from cutting granite slabs from granite rock. These pieces will generally cost between $15 and $40 per square foot, and because they are larger than the granite tiles, they will be quicker to install and have fewer joins. Additionally, many suppliers supply the modular granite already sealed so you won’t need sealant.

DIY (not really an option for most people)

Without the right tools to do the work, and the knowledge and experience that comes from a history of working with stone, it is unlikely that you will be able to successfully install granite slab, modular granite, or granite tiles yourself. Instead, look for certified and insured professionals like Best Kitchens & Baths in Philadelphia, who will meet you at your home to take measurements, take pictures of the project area, and follow up with an appointment at the showroom to discuss the project plans and give you a written proposal. Also, working with an experienced company like Formations Construction in Huntington Station, New York, with 30 years in the business, will go a long way toward quality results.

Choosing your contractor

  1. Choose a contractor with a lot of experience working with granite. Troy Granite’s (DE, PA, NJ, MD) expertise when it comes to granite is impressive: “A family owned granite showroom/fabrication with over 25 years of experience in the natural stone industry. From estimator to shop workers, from managers to drivers, from receptionist to countertop installers, from designers to saw machine operators; we have over 140 full time & fully trained members.” Being able to draw on that kind of experience when making your decision is invaluable.
  2. A contractor who is experienced in working with granite will check your existing kitchen cabinets to ensure their ability to hold up the weight of the granite.
  3. Get at least three quotes to include removal and disposal of the old countertops, installation, and cleanup. Include start and finish dates.
  4. Make sure the contractor you choose is bonded and insured.
  5. When taking out old countertops, the contractors may encounter difficulties with either plumbing or electrical work, which, depending on the age of the kitchen, may require some replacement work too.
  6. Each finish will need to be sealed, so when getting a quote for your countertop, check to see if this is included and what the various options are.

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