How much does it cost to replace or repair a sewer line?
Ashburn, VA

How much does it cost to replace or repair a sewer line?

Ashburn, VA

How much does it cost to replace or repair a sewer line?

$50 – $250replacement cost per linear foot
$2,000 – $10,000average total replacement cost (40 linear feet)
$150 – $3,800 average repair cost

Get free estimates for your project or view our cost guide below:

$50 – $250 replacement cost per linear foot

$2,000 – $10,000 average total replacement cost (40 linear feet)

$150 – $3,800 average repair cost


Get free estimates for your project or view our cost guide below:
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Jennifer Carlson
Written by
Jennifer Carlson
Edited by
Kristen Cramer
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Sewer line replacement cost

Sewer line replacement costs $50 to $250 per linear foot on average or $2,000 to $10,000 for 40 linear feet. Sewer line repairs cost $150 to $3,800, depending on the method. Small tree roots or clogs only need a basic repair. Broken lines and large cracks require full or partial replacement.

Sewer line replacement cost by size
Length (linear feet) Average total cost
10 $500 – $2,500
20 $1,000 – $5,000
40 $2,000 – $10,000
60 $3,000 – $15,000
80 $4,000 – $20,000

Get free estimates from sewer service companies near you.

Average cost to replace a sewer line

The following table shows the average cost to replace a residential sewer line:

Average cost to replace a sewer line - Chart
Average cost to replace a sewer line - Chart
Average cost to replace a sewer line
National Average Cost$6,000
Minimum Cost$500
Maximum Cost$20,000
Average Range$2,000 to $10,000

Sewer line repair cost

The cost to repair a sewer line depends on the method and problem. Small clogs or obstructions may just need to be snaked. A broken, cracked, or collapsed sewer line will need a partial replacement or a lining.

Sewer line repair cost by method
Repair type Average cost
Pipe bursting $60 – $200 per linear foot
CIPP $90 – $250 per linear foot
Spin-casting $80 – $250 per linear foot
Snaking $150 – $500
Hydro jet $250 – $800

Pipe bursting

Sewer line pipe bursting costs $60 to $200 per linear foot on average. This method forces new piping through an existing pipe. A machine pushes the old pipe out of one side as the new pipe is fed into the other.

Trenchless sewer line replacement graphic showing new pipe bursting old pipe
Trenchless sewer line replacement graphic showing new pipe bursting old pipe

CIPP

Cured-in-place pipe lining (CIPP) costs $90 to $250 per linear foot and is a type of pipe repair that coats the inside of a damaged pipe without having to dig it up. The contractor inserts and inflates a soft, epoxy-coated liner into the existing sewer line.

Spin-casting

Spin-casting costs $80 to $250 per linear foot on average. This method involves spraying a resin lining directly into the existing sewer line instead of using a CIPP liner.

Snaking & hydro jetting

Clearing a sewer line costs $150 to $500 for a basic snaking or $250 to $800 for hydro jetting. Drain snakes or augers are best for minor clogs and older pipes. Hydro jets use high-pressure water to clear major clogs and tree roots.

Plumber using sewer snake to clean clogged sewer line
Plumber using sewer snake to clean clogged sewer line

Sewer line replacement cost factors

The following factors may affect the replacement or repair cost:

  • Replacement length – Partial replacements and repairs cost less because they may only be between 1 to 15 feet, while most full sewer system replacements are around 40 feet.

  • Type of disruption – Removing tree roots or replacing one small section costs less than a collapsed line or extensive damage.

  • Inspection A sewer camera inspection costs $125 to $500 and helps the contractor form an accurate diagnosis, plan, and estimate.

  • Pipe location – Replacing sewer lines that are only covered by soil or sod costs less than replacing piping under basements, driveways, or sidewalks. Concrete removal costs $3 to $8 per square foot extra.

  • Backflow prevention – Installing a backflow preventer costs $150 to $1,200 and keeps waste away from your home. An overhead or above-ground sewer system costs more but can also prevent backflow into your basement.

  • Sewer cleanout – Adding a sewer cleanout costs $500 to $2,000 on average. Plumbers use cleanout access points to remove clogs in the line more easily.

  • Permits – Plumbing permits cost $30 to $500, depending on the project and local prices. Most contractors can obtain permits for you.

  • Home type – Your housing type may affect the sewer line cost. Single-family homeowners usually handle the total cost. If you own a townhome or condo, your HOA may cover it.

Labor

Most plumbers charge $75 to $150 per hour, depending on their level of experience and local rates. The plumber may need to hire a subcontractor if they don't have the manpower or equipment to do the trenching for your project.

Contractor installing a new sewer line for a home
Contractor installing a new sewer line for a home

Sewer line materials

Copper and cast-iron are the most durable but expensive. Many plumbers use plastic piping because it's more affordable and not prone to corrosion. The following table gives pricing for

4-inch sewer pipe materials, not including any connectors or valves:

Sewer line cost by material
Pipe material Average cost per linear foot*
Cast-iron $20 – $75
Copper $30 – $80
PEX $2 – $10
PVC $3 – $8
ABS $3 – $11

*Materials only

  • Cast-iron – Cast-iron sewer pipes cost $20 and $75 per linear foot on average and are not commonly used anymore because of their tendency to rust.

  • Copper – Copper sewer piping costs $30 to $80 per linear foot and is more lightweight than iron and more durable than plastic. However, copper pipes may freeze in the winter and are not the best option for acidic or well water.

  • PEX – PEX plastic sewer pipes cost $2 and $10 per linear foot. PEX is more affordable and flexible than copper and more resistant to extreme temperatures than PVC.

  • PVC – Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) piping costs $3 and $8 per linear foot. This material is budget-friendly and easy to install but not as durable as other materials.

  • ABS – ABS sewer pipes cost $3 to $11 per linear foot on average and are made of recycled plastic resin. ABS is better for extremely cold climates but doesn't stand up well to heat.

Traditional vs. trenchless digging

Traditional trench digging costs $5 to $12 per linear foot for sewer lines, depending on the depth and if there are any obstacles that need to be removed. Contractors bury sewer lines and may need to repair grass or landscaping afterwards.

Trenchless digging, horizontal boring, or directional boring costs $10 to $30 per linear foot and uses heavy machinery to quickly bore a path underground without digging from above. This method doesn't require repairs afterward because the equipment can bore beneath your yard and driveway without causing damage.

Sewer line installation with PVC pipes at a residential home
Sewer line installation with PVC pipes at a residential home

Other costs

Common obstacles and costs you may encounter when replacing a sewer line include:

Get free estimates from sewer service companies near you.

Sewer line repair & replacement FAQs

How long does it take to replace or repair a sewer line?

Replacing or repairing a sewer line takes 1 to 5 days on average, depending on the number of obstacles and length of the section needing replacement. Trenchless sewer line replacements take less time than digging trenches.

How do I know if I need to replace or repair my sewer pipes?

Look for these common signs that indicate a sewer line needs work:

  • Unpleasant odors

  • Gurgling sounds

  • Clogged drains

  • Debris in the bath or basement

  • Leaking or puddles

Who is responsible for sewer line repair?

In most cases, homeowners are responsible for maintaining, replacing, and repairing their pipes that connect to the main line. However, your city or municipality is responsible if the blockages or issues are in the main city line.

How long do sewer lines last?

Sewer lines last 30 to 100 years, depending on the material. Outdated Orangeburg and clay sewer pipes last 30 to 60 years, while PVC, cast iron, and copper sewer lines last 50 to 100 years. The life expectancy will ultimately depend on maintenance, the soil condition, and nearby tree roots.

Does homeowners' insurance cover sewer line repair or replacement?

Homeowners insurance policies differ in coverage, but most do not cover wear and tear due to lack of maintenance. Many policies cover damage from faulty workmanship, accidents, or vandalism. Specific sewer line insurance covers more repairs and damage to sewer systems than basic homeowners' insurance.

Getting estimates from sewer service companies

Before hiring a sewer line contractor, be sure to:

  • Get at least three in-person estimates to compare.

  • Look for companies that have been in business for 5+ years.

  • Check out reviews on HomeGuide and Google.

  • Verify their insurance, license, and bonds.

  • Avoid companies with the cheapest quotes as quality may suffer.

  • Get a detailed estimate, contract, and warranty before the work begins.

  • Never pay in full before the project starts.

Questions to ask sewer line contractors

To hire a high-quality plumber, ask the following questions:

  • How long have you been in business?

  • Do you have any certifications for installing or repairing sewer lines?

  • Are you licensed, bonded, and insured?

  • How long will it take to replace the sewer system?

  • What type of piping material do you recommend?

  • Does this estimate include cleanup?

  • What other costs can I expect?

  • Will you need to remove any trees or landscaping?

  • Will you be hiring any subcontractors?

  • What does your warranty cover?