Ashburn, VA

How Much Do Polished Concrete Floors Cost?

$3 – $8 Per Square Foot (Average)
$8 – $15 Per Square Foot (High-end)

Polished concrete floors cost $3 to $8 per square foot for an average design and $5 to $15 per square foot for multiple colors, patterns, scoring, and sealing. Polished concrete flooring costs $600 to $3,200 for a patio, $1,000 to $4,500 for a garage or driveway, and $2,000 to $8,000 for a basement. Get free estimates from concrete polishing contractors near you or view our cost guide below.

Polished Concrete Floors Cost

Residential polished concrete floors cost $3 to $5 per square foot for a basic design with one layer of stain polished. A more elaborate design costs $5 to $15 per square foot for multiple colors, custom patterns, scoring (saw cuts), faux finishes, sealing, and polishing to a higher sheen.

Polished Concrete Floors Cost Per Square Foot

Polished Concrete Floors Cost Per Square Foot
Level Cost Per Square Foot Description
Basic $3 – $5 Minor prep work, one layer of stain, grinding and polished to moderate shine
Mid-range $5 – $8 Minor repairs, in-depth grinding, two colors of stain, scoring, sealing, and a higher sheen.
High-end $8 – $15 Surface repairs, custom designs, patterns, stencil work, staining, scoring (saw cuts), faux finishes, multiple colors, sealing, and polishing.

Polished concrete is used inside and outside the home due to its affordability, resiliency, and durability. It's an excellent option for kitchens, bathrooms, basements, patios, driveways, and garages.

Polished Concrete Flooring Cost By Residential Project

Residential Polished Concrete Floors Cost
Area Average Cost
Bathroom $200 – $600
Kitchen $500 – $1,800
Patio $600 – $3,200
Garage $800 – $4,500
Driveway $1,000 – $5,000
Basement $2,000 – $8,000
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Average Polished Concrete Floor Cost

Average Polished Concrete Floor Cost
National Average Cost $2,428
Minimum Cost $200
Maximum Cost $8,000
Average Range $1,280 to $4,608
  • Lifecycle cost up to 60% lower than other floor types.
  • Does not harbor allergy dust, mold, mildew, dust mites, or other allergens.
  • Durable, low maintenance, versatile, and increases a home’s resale value.
  • Wide variety of colors, patterns, design options.

Table of Contents

  1. Polished Concrete Floors Cost
  2. Cost To Polish Existing Concrete Floors
  3. Cost of Polished Concrete Floors vs. Alternatives
  4. Polished Concrete Floors Pros and Cons
  5. Other Polished Concrete Costs
  6. Frequently Asked Questions
  7. DIY Concrete Polishing Cost
  8. Hiring a Concrete Polishing Contractor
  9. Concrete Floor Contractors Near Me

Cost To Polish Existing Concrete Floors

The average cost to polish existing concrete floors is $3 to $15 per square foot, depending on the job size, prep work, and complexity. Concrete surface repairs and design, stamping, staining, and sealing work can add $1 to $10 per square foot or more to the overall cost.

Cost To Polish Existing Concrete Floors
Task Cost Per Square Foot Description
Remove Existing Flooring $0.50 – $3 (Optional) Includes removal and disposal
Light Surface Prep Included Removing glue, dirt, grease, coatings, or blemishes
Concrete Repairs $1 – $3 (Optional) Fill in cracks, remove remaining epoxy/glue
Screed / Overlay $2 – $5 (Optional) Resurfacing creates a level, smooth, and protective surface
Underlay $2 – $5 (Optional) Cement board underlay for an on-grade or above-grade floor
Grinding $1 – $4 Sands and prepares the concrete over a single pass
Polishing $2 – $6 Hones the surface to a shine over multiple passes
Designs, Scoring, Staining $2 – $25 (Optional) Color(s), saw cuts, patterns, stencil work
Sealing $2 – $4 (Optional but recommended) Protects against stains, acid, and chemicals, offers skid and water-resistance.

Living and dining room with concrete flooring that is stained, polished, and sealed

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Size & Area of Floor

Small, tight areas may require polishing by hand, which costs more per square foot. More square footage allows for bigger machinery to work faster and is easier to polish with consistent results. Other labor-intensive factors that can increase the cost are:

  • Close, narrow walls
  • Doorway openings and room-access challenges
  • Odd-shaped floors
  • Basements
  • Built-in furniture
  • Above-grade floors

Condition of the Existing Concrete Floor

Light surface preparation, such as removing glue, dirt, grease, coatings, or blemishes, is typically included in the contract. Extensive concrete surface repairs like holes, cracks, or gouges cost $1 to $3 per square foot to fix. Cracks need to be filled with epoxy and sealed before polishing.

If the floor is in very poor condition, too wavy, needs extensive patching, is extremely porous, or is actively heaving, it may not be a good candidate for polishing and may need to be removed and re-poured.

Removing Existing Flooring

Removing any existing flooring costs $0.50 to $3.00 per square foot on average for labor and disposal. Old flooring removal costs depend on the type of existing flooring and effort required.

Remove Existing Flooring
Material Cost Per Square Foot
Carpet Removal Costs $0.11 – $0.56
Hardwood or Engineered Wood Removal $0.50 – $4.00
Stone, Ceramic, or Porcelain Tile Removal $1.50 – $4.00
Vinyl or Linoleum Removal $0.50 – $1.00

Cost to Grind Concrete Floor

The cost to grind a concrete floor is $1 to $4 per square foot. Grinding or sanding concrete removes adhesives and curing agents, opens up the pores, removes the smooth look, and flattens the surface. Then, polishing hones the surface to a shine for $2 to $6 per square foot.

The grinding and polishing process uses the same equipment, just with different pads. Grinding is typically a single pass, and polishing may take four passes. The amount of grinding and polishing determines the sheen and gloss of the concrete floor. A high-gloss finish takes longer and costs more.

Levels of Grinding & Polish
Level Look Grit Level Reflective Clarity # of Abrasive Passes
1) Flat (Ground) Matte Finish < 100 0-9 4
2) Satin (Honed) Low Reflectivity 100 – 400 10-39 5
3) Semi-Polished High Reflectivity 800+ 40-69 6
4) Highly-Polished Max Reflectivity 3000 70-100 7

*Levels of polish measured in Distinctiveness of Image (DOI). Polishing to a high gloss does not make the floor slippier.

Residential home entry hall with polished concrete floors

Polished Screed Floor Cost

Polished screed flooring costs $2 to $5 per square foot, depending on the condition of the concrete. Screed is a thin concrete overlay that's poured over the slab to create a level, smooth, insulating, durable, and protective surface necessary for grinding and polishing.

Screed is made of the same mixture of concrete, but with a finer aggregate that creates a smoother texture.

Stained, Stenciled, Stamped & Scored Concrete Floors Cost

Staining concrete floors costs $5 to $15 per square foot on average, depending on the job size, prep work, number of colors, and complexity. A simple stain costs $2 to $4 per square foot, while multiple colors or layering, saw cuts, and custom patterns run $10 to $25 per square foot.

Stained Concrete Floors Cost
Level Cost Per Square Foot Includes
Basic $2 – $4
  • One color
  • Minimal prep
  • Final sealer
Intermediate $4 – $10
  • One color
  • Minimal prep
  • Minimal design
  • Final sealer
Upgraded $8 – $12
  • Intermediate +
  • Complex design
  • Various colors
High-End $12 – $25
  • Upgraded +
  • Stencil designs
  • Hand stained

Any color of concrete floor is obtainable with dyed, stained, or colored ready-mix or colored overlay concrete options. Color or design elements can be added before the concrete pour or after the concrete has hardened.

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Stamped concrete costs $5 to $12 per square foot, which is performed when the concrete is poured. Scored concrete to create tile, natural stone, or patterned shapes costs $1 to $2 per square foot.

Stenciled, Stamped & Scored Concrete Floors Cost
Option Cost Per Square Foot
Stencil Work $1 – $10
Layering Staining $18+
Acid Etching $2 – $7
Stamping $5 – $12
Scoring $1 – $2

Sealing Polished Concrete Floors

Sealing concrete floors costs $2 to $4 per square foot for materials and labor. The sealant materials alone cost $0.20 to $1.30 per square foot. Polished concrete does not require sealing, but it protects against stains, acid, and chemicals, offers skid resistance, and more water-resistance.

Different post-seal polish, buffing treatment, and cleaning is required to maintain the seal, depending on if the sealant is topical or penetrating.

Modern living room with polished concrete flooring and sliding glass doors

Above Grade Concrete Floor

Installing an above-grade concrete floor over an existing subfloor requires a cement-board underlayment or structural reinforcement. Installing a cement underlayment adds $2 to $5 per square foot to the total cost of the polished concrete floors.

To support a large area of concrete floor on a residential second story or higher (elevated slab), an engineer or architect needs to assess the foundation, bearing walls, and support beams to ensure they can support the weight of the above-grade floor.

For smaller spaces like a bathroom, the home’s structure is sufficient to support the weight of the floor with only a cement-board underlayment.

Tips for Color, Durability, and Cost Savings

Concrete Mix

  • Adding polypropylene fibers in the concrete mix helps prevent cracking.
  • Increasing the fly ash content in the concrete mix increases the durability and adds a marble-type finish to the floor.
  • Aggregates sourced from quarries, oceans, rivers, or recyclables achieve an interesting and organic pattern or design when exposed in polished concrete.

Colors & Stains

  • Adding pigment to the concrete mix (structural color) offers more color consistency than stained concrete, although adding color after it's poured can produce dramatic effects. A more subtle structural color is achieved by adding metal oxides.
  • Water-based stains offer predictable color and a wide variety of shades, while traditional acid etching stain does not.
  • Concrete dyes offer many saturated bright colors and dry faster than staining, but they need a UV stable sealer to keep from fading. Tinted concrete sealers are another cost-effective way to add subtle shades of color, but wears off as the sealant does.

Remodeled Kitchen with high-gloss polished concrete floors

Looks

  • Concrete floors can have inlay tiles or divider strips added, be stamped to mimic stone or paved brick, and stenciled.
  • Another technique is to add saw cuts or etching to colored concrete, mimicking a tile floor.

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Cost of Polished Concrete Floors vs. Alternatives

The cost to replace flooring varies when comparing polished concrete vs. stained concrete, tile, hardwood, epoxy, carpet, and other flooring materials.

Cost of Polished Concrete Floors vs. Alternatives
Material Cost Per Square Foot Features
Polished Concrete $3 – $15
  • Can last a lifetime
  • High-durability, easy to maintain
  • Slip, scratch, chemical, and thermal shock resistant
  • Not recommended for outdoor use
  • Colors and patterns can be customized
  • Higher installation costs. More labor-intensive
Stained Concrete $2 – $10
  • Low maintenance
  • Affordable, depending on the complexity, pattern, sawed lines
  • Many design options
  • Subject to wearing and color fading in high-traffic areas, which leads to dusting
  • May offer less slip resistance and can crack over time
Tile Flooring $7 – $24
  • Durable and easy to maintain
  • Water-resistant
  • Slippery when wet
  • Always cold
Hardwood Flooring $6 – $20
  • Durable and can last a lifetime
  • Low maintenance
  • Available in several types of woods and colors
  • Increases home value
Epoxy Flooring $3 – $7
  • Adds slip resistance
  • Withstand thermal shock and extreme temperature cycling
  • Unique and vibrant design options
  • Great for garage floors
Carpet $2 – $5
  • Comfortable
  • Affordable
  • Warm
Vinyl Flooring $3 – $7
  • Highly-durable
  • Affordable and easy to install
  • Water-resistant
  • Unique designs and patterns
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Polished Concrete vs. Stained Concrete

Polished Concrete vs. Stained Concrete
Polished Concrete Stained Concrete
$3 – $12 per square foot $2 – $10 per square foot
  • Costs more depending on the level of sheen. More labor-intensive
  • More durable and scratch-resistant
  • Not recommended for outdoor use
  • Colors and patterns can be customized
  • Costs less, depending on the complexity, pattern, sawed lines
  • Subject to wearing and color fading in high-traffic areas, which leads to dusting (the concrete base wearing away).
  • Requires more maintenance than unsealed polished concrete
  • May offer less acid, chemical, and slip resistance

Cost of Polished Concrete Floors vs. Tiles

The cost of polished concrete floors is $3 to $12 per square foot vs. tile flooring costs $7 to $24 per square foot. Polished concrete floors can be stamped to look like most tiles and are water-resistant. Natural stone, like slate, offers more skid resistance than polished concrete.

Cost of Polished Concrete Floors vs. Tiles
Polished Concrete Tiles
$3 – $12 per square foot $7 – $24 per square foot
  • Can be stamped to look like most tiles.
  • Does not have moisture absorption issues.
  • Some natural stone, like slate, offer more skid resistance than polished concrete.
  • Porcelain tile absorbs water at a slower rate, which is great for bathrooms.

Polished Concrete vs. Hardwood Cost

Polished concrete floors cost $3 to $12 per square foot vs. hardwood flooring costs $6 to $20 per square foot.

Polished Concrete vs. Hardwood Cost
Polished Concrete Hardwood
$3 – $12 per square foot $6 – $20 per square foot
  • Significantly more durable than hardwood
  • Does not harbor mold, mildew, dust mites, or other allergens.
  • Not susceptible to humidity or rotting
  • Non-combustible in the case of a fire
  • Eco-sustainable
  • Increases home value, and more visually appealing to some home buyers
  • Warmer on cold mornings
  • Eco-sustainable
  • Easier to stand on for long periods than concrete

Polished Concrete vs. Epoxy Cost

Polished concrete floors cost $3 to $12 per square foot vs. epoxy flooring costs $3 to $7 per square foot.

Polished Concrete vs. Epoxy Cost
Polished Concrete Epoxy
$3 – $12 per square foot $3 – $7 per square foot
  • More durable than epoxy
  • Lower maintenance
  • Unique and vibrant design options
  • Does not protect from harsh chemicals and acids
  • Durable plastic resistant to chemical spills
  • Hides imperfections and adds slip resistance
  • Ability to withstand thermal shock and extreme temperature cycling
  • Unique and vibrant design options

Cost of Polished Concrete Floors vs. Carpet

Polished concrete floors cost $3 to $12 per square foot, vs. carpet installation costs at $2 to $5 per square foot. Polished concrete is more water-resistant, lower maintenance, significantly more durable, and has more design options. Carpet is affordable, comfortable, and warm.

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Polished Concrete Floors Pros and Cons

Polished concrete’s durability, maintenance, versatility, cost, and sustainability also come with some negatives.

Polished Concrete Floors Pros and Cons
Pros Cons
  • Longevity - Can last a lifetime with minimal maintenance
  • Withstands wear and pressure, hard to damage or stain, resists tire marks
  • Low maintenance - only dusting or wet mopping. No waxing or floor stripping necessary
  • Lifecycle costs can be 60% less than other floors
  • Versatility - Numerous color and design options
  • Eco-friendly, LEED-approved materials are available to render and color floor
  • Mold and mildew resistant. Hypoallergenic – prevents the build-up of allergens and reduces the airborne silica present from unpolished concrete
  • Increases light in a space up to 100%
  • No need to remove existing floor to lay the desired flooring
  • No shock absorption; whatever falls on it can be damaged or shattered
  • Can be uncomfortable and cold to stand on
  • Amplifies sound
  • Slippery when wet if it does not meet or exceed OSHA and ADA standards for slip resistance
  • Not stain proof – can be damaged by chemical or acid spills
  • Can chip and hairline crack over time

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Other Polished Concrete Costs

Polished concrete is also gaining popularity on walls, countertops, and worktop benches.

Other Polished Concrete Costs
Item Cost Per Square Foot
Polished Concrete Walls $10 – $60
Polished Concrete Countertops $60 – $130
Cement Laminate Floors $2 – $8

Cement laminate floors can look like concrete floors, but they are durable, energy-efficient, fire-resistant, and less expensive than poured concrete.

Polished Concrete Walls Cost

Polished precast concrete walls or block panels cost $10 to $60 per square foot, depending on the size, shape, and thickness of the wall, and whether it's on grade or above. An alternative is adding concrete micro-topping to vertical surfaces (drywall) for $1.50 to $2.00 per square foot.

  • Plastering walls with a concrete mix and then polishing, can be cheaper and have more longevity in cold climates. Adding an acrylic sealer is optional.
  • Concrete veneers and precast block and wall panels are pre-made and installed on top of the substrate floor or walls. Veneer adds structural strength, but it's thinner and lighter than overlay and does not bond as well. Specific sizes, colors, and textures can be customized.

Polished Concrete Countertops Cost

Polished concrete countertops cost $60 to $130 per square foot to install, which is similar when compared to granite countertops at $50 to $200 per square foot. Prices depend on the design, colors, gloss polished level, edging, stenciling, stamping, and inlays.

Polished Concrete Countertops vs. Granite Cost
Polished Concrete Granite
$60 to $130 per square foot $50 to $200 per square foot
More design options, patterns, shapes, colors Different grades, thicknesses, and bevels, and colors
Stain-resistant when sealed Not stain-resistant when sealed
Can develop hairline cracks Extremely durable, unlikely to crack

Polished Concrete Worktops & Benchtops Cost

Polished concrete worktops or benchtops cost $55 to $60 per square foot, which is about the same as granite or marble countertops. Polishing prices depend on the size, color, level of shine, shape, edge, and design. Some worktops may require structural support, which increases costs.

Commercial spaces cost less at $2 to $8 per square foot[12] since a larger crew and machinery can be onsite for quicker job completion, and there are fewer edges to be done in large open spaces.

Polished Concrete Basement Floor Cost

Polished concrete basement floors cost $3 to $12 per square foot or between $2,000 and $8,000 on average. By polishing the basement floor, the substrate, although dense, remains breathable, and the reduced moisture vapor eliminates mold and mildew growth. Polishing concrete also adds brightness to a basement if highly honed.

Polished Concrete Patio & Driveway Cost

Polishing a concrete patio or driveway costs $3 to $8 per square foot on average, depending on the size, complexity, number of colors, and sheen. Outdoor polished concrete requires ongoing maintenance to retain its look and lengthen its lifespan.

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Treated Concrete Floors Cost

In addition to polishing, other options to treat floors include griding and sealing, burnished, and epoxy coating.

Treated Concrete Floors Cost
Polished Grind & Seal Burnished Epoxy
Max Shine Level Very high Very high High Extremely high
Durability Very high Medium Low-medium Low-medium
Maintenance Refurbish every 10 years - can last a lifetime Reseal every 1-2 years if high traffic – 3-5 years normally Reseal every 1-2 years if high traffic – 2-3 years normally Can last 15-20 years, depending on traffic
Cost (SF) $3 – $12 $3 – $7 $3 – $12 $3 – $7
Needs Sealing Optional but recommended Yes Yes No, epoxy is sealant
Design Variety High High High High
Labor Intensive Yes, depending on desired finish Medium Low Low
Drying Time None if no sealant used 3-8 days dependent on sealant product used 3-8 days dependent on sealant product used 24 hours normally
Pros
  • Most durable
  • Eco-friendly
  • High traffic friendly and highly scratch-resistant
  • Increases light by 100%
  • Low cost to refurbish – a fraction of initial installation
  • Less labor-intensive
  • Less expensive to install
  • Skid-resistant
  • Fewer steps to install
  • Less labor-intensive
  • Skid-resistant
  • Hides blemishes
  • Highly reflective. Increases light by 300%
  • Acid and chemical proof
  • Prevents slipping
Cons
  • Highest cost – most labor-intensive
  • Inconsistent results in different rooms
  • Not as stain or chemical resistant
  • Can discolor in high traffic areas
  • Subject to wear and disintegration (dusting) in high traffic areas
  • Might need to be resealed/re-waxed 1-2 times per year if high traffic
  • Susceptible to scratches, faded colors, and worn coatings
  • Not durable long term
  • Large floors can have an inconsistent pattern
  • Difficult to install properly
  • Does not hide imperfections
  • Cost more to reinstall than initial install
  • May need to be reinstalled in 3 years or sooner
  • Not eco-friendly
  • Can peel, flake and chip
  • Can have air moisture pockets

Burnished Concrete Floors

Burnished concrete resembles polished concrete, but it's not as durable and not considered a high-quality finish. However, burnished floors are easier to install, are less expensive, and still shine. Burnished concrete can be inconsistent, and flaws in the floor can be highlighted if improperly installed.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What Is Polished Concrete Floors?

Polished concrete, also called bonded abrasive polished concrete or mechanically polished concrete (MPC), is an affordable alternative to other floorings. The concrete will be stained, grinded, polished, and sealed to create a high-gloss look.

Can You Polish Existing Concrete?

Any new or existing structurally solid concrete floor can be polished. However, existing concrete floors require surface preparation and cleaning before polishing. New concrete floors that will be polished performs better with a thicker pour, but doesn't require a special mix.

Does Polished Concrete Need to Be Sealed?

Polished concrete does not need to be sealed, but it may stain and show watermarks easily. Sealing polished concrete provides extra protection, which requires less maintenance over time. Some sealants might also change color with exposure to UV light.

How Long Does Polished Concrete Last?

Polished concrete floors last well over 20 years or even a lifetime if maintained properly. Polished concrete floors last longer if refurbished every 15 years, depending on the age, condition, and environment.

Is Polished Concrete Slippery?

Polished concrete floors are no more slippery than any other hard, flat flooring. Mechanically polished concrete is slip-resistant, however, most flooring options are slippery when wet.

Is Polished Concrete Waterproof?

Polished concrete floors are waterproof. During installation, grinding and sealing creates a protective surface which does not absorb water.

Does Polished Concrete Scratch Easily?

Polished concrete flooring extremely strong and does not chip or scratch easily.

Still have questions? Ask a concrete polishing pro. View Pros

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DIY Concrete Polishing Cost

DIY polished concrete floors cost $1,000 to $2,400 for materials and rental equipment. Concrete polishing costs depend on the size of the floor and type of finish.

DIY Concrete Polishing Cost
Item Average Cost
Grinder $460 – $1,280
Mini Grinder $80 – $85
Vacuum $105 – $200
Knee Cart $20 – $70
Diamond polishing pads and discs, densifier, guard $350 – $725
Total $1,015 – $2,360

You can rent wet or dry floor polishers for dust control. If your rental polisher does not reach the edges of your room, you should also rent an edger.

How To Install A Polished Concrete Floor

  1. Pour the concrete slab and allow it to cure for 28 days.
  2. Sweep floor, clear debris, and find areas that need repair.
  3. Test hardness of the floor to select correct metal abrasives. Test at least 3 areas to get accurate average with a MOHS Concrete Hardness Tester.
  4. Grind the floor with an appropriate level abrasive grinding pad. Go slow, making sure you overlap slightly to avoid bare patches.
  5. Fill or repair cracks, holes, or scratches in the floor. The coating must be removed before repairing floor.
  6. Grind with the next level of grits, going from heavy to light. Monitor how much floor surface is being removed and keep floor level.
  7. Continue with the metal bonded discs, using finer and finer grit until you get the concrete to the desired level of smoothness.
  8. Apply a liquid concrete densifier to harden floor and prepare it for final level of polishing. Ensure that the densifier does not puddle while it dries; else, it will cause stains.
  9. Take final polishing passes, with a proper level of grit, until reaching the desired level of shine.
  10. Apply sealant, if desired.

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Hiring a Concrete Polishing Contractor

Specialized concrete contractors typically have more expertise and experience than general contractors. Experienced contractors ensure the floor is properly floated, and the aggregate evenly distributed.

When choosing a concrete flooring contractor:

  • Get at least three in-person estimates from contractors and compare. Ask questions about concerning differences
  • Ask for recommendations from family, friends, and neighbors.
  • Ask questions – Do they know proper polishing techniques? Will subcontractors be used? Are there guarantees or warranties? Is producing a sample of floor choice included? Is quote binding?
  • Read reviews and check out their previous work on HomeGuide, Google, and the Better Business Bureau (BBB).
  • Check to verify their licensing and insurance is valid and up to date.
  • Ask for a full itemized contract in writing in case of a dispute.
  • Avoid making large payments upfront. Never pay in full or in cash, and come up with a payment schedule for work completed.

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