Ashburn, VA

Average Cost for Patio Enclosures is
$8,112–$18,748 ($70/sqft)

At an average cost of $70/sqft, you can either partially enclose or fully enclose your patio. A partial enclosure would give you privacy and ward off wind and rain, while a full enclosure can stop bugs from getting in and keep the patio temperature at a bearable level. The number of choices for a patio enclosure can seem endless, with costs ranging from $180 up to $45,000 for high-end enclosed patios. Get free instant estimates from local patio builders near you.

Patio Enclosures Cost

Author: Daniel W.
Millions of people ask HomeGuide for cost estimates every year. We track the estimates they get from local companies, then we share those prices with you.

You’ve decided to enclose your patio because you’re tired of the rain, the mosquitoes, the lack of shade, or even the cold. For this article, we’ll cover the cost of adding a roof or awning and the process of setting up a frame around your existing patio to hold screens or panels that fit with the season. Knowing your budget going in will help a lot when selecting your final type of enclosure.

This pricing guide covers:

Patio Enclosures Cost

By definition, a patio enclosure is not the same as adding another room to your home. It’s not going to have the foundation of your home, nor will it have access to your home’s HVAC system. If that’s what you want, consider building an extension instead (at least $75,000).

At an average cost of $70/sqft, you can either partially enclose or fully enclose your patio. A partial enclosure would give you privacy and ward off wind and rain, while a full enclosure can stop bugs from getting in and keep the patio temperature at a bearable level. The number of choices for a patio enclosure can seem endless, with costs ranging from $180 up to $45,000 for high-end enclosed patios.

Cost to build a patio enclosure

Patio Enclosure Type Cost
National Average Cost $13,179
Minimum Cost $180
Maximum Cost $45,000
Average Range $8,112 to $18,748

Patio Enclosures

Types of Patio Enclosures

  • Screen room – enclose the patio with screens or drapes
  • Three season room – enclose the patio with full length glass or retractable panels
  • Four season room – add a heating and cooling system to the three-season room
  • Solarium – enclose the patio with glass roof and panels

Read Patio Enclosures’ Sunroom Comparison Chart for more details.

No matter what you want to call it, it can be a huge relief to get some extra space in the house so you’re not all on top of each other, especially if your kids are now teenagers and taking over your living room with their friends. You can have your own quiet space again.

Expect the enclosure to take 2–3 weeks to build.

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Patio Roof & Framing Costs

If your patio doesn’t already have a roof, this is where you need to start. Choices in your patio roofing range from material awnings to composite materials. If you want the patio to be fully enclosed, you’ll need to make sure the roof and frame are not freestanding. You can use a ledgerboard to attach the cover to your home’s roof.

Patio Cover Types

Choose a full or partial cover for your patio.

  • Partial covering - Though not a full covering, some like to give their roofing frame partial coverage with material, lattice, or shade cloth.
  • Full coverage - Some choose to put material over a pergola type roof while others are more inclined to add a more solid and durable covering like corrugated iron or more wood. Others would rather go all in and extend the existing roof on the home to provide a more seamless look to the patio.
  • Insulated – This roof will have insulation to keep your patio at the temperature you’d like. Homeowners prefer this to a simpler roof as it cuts costs on temperature maintenance.

Average Costs for Patio Roofing & Framing

Patio Material Average Cost
Steel Patio Gazebo Kit $180–$330
Patio Kit $900+
Wood Varies
Aluminum/Metal Patio Kit $4,800–$6,000
Custom Built $8,000-$45,000

Patio Enclosures Sunroom

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Steel Patio Gazebo Enclosure Cost

Your most basic, low-cost type of patio enclosure isn’t so much an enclosure as a tent. The roof is a material awning on a steel frame, and you can hang curtains on its perimeter. The patio is then fully closed in, in a tent-like structure with a metal frame. Because it’s not attached to the house, it’s not a good permanent option and might not withstand local winds and rain. You can expect to pay between $180–$330 for this option.

Another option is to have clear plastic curtains or roll-down panes similar to those restaurants install in the colder months. The look will be like that of a gazebo cover and drapes or screens. Also available are numerous individual panels that attach to a rail system on the pergola rafters to create a single- or multi-colored/tent-like canopy. Shade cloth can cut out 70% of the sunlight.

Pre-built Patio Enclosure Kit Costs

The next option with a detachable awning is made of aluminum posts and fiberglass screens. It will have one or two doors with screens to keep bugs out, and it can be put away for the winter months. The average cost for a pre-built patio kit starts at $900+.

Wood & Hardware Patio Enclosures

While wood frames seem the most obvious and cost-effective choice for roofing your patio, many homeowners are saying that wood rot and termite damage mean it will need to be replaced within years. They are opting for composite, metal, or vinyl roofs and frames instead. That said, you can build with treated wood and delay the damage.

Patio Enclosures

Another option is custom-built wood covers. Have your patio roof and frame custom built, or order the kit and have a contractor install it for you.

Companies like J&W Lumbar offer many options when it comes to building your patio cover. Choose your wood, wood thickness, roofing option, post sizes, hardware package, and stain option to get the exact look you want.

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Aluminum & Metal Patio Enclosures Costs

As mentioned before, metal will not rot or succumb to termite damage. It’s also noncombustible, so it will fare well if there’s a fire. It reflects sunlight rather than absorbs it, and snow and rain bounce off it. You can buy corrugated steel in panels of various widths and colors. You can even buy panels that are designed to rust naturally, if you prefer the historic/natural look.

Any good contractor can add a metal roof to your existing setup.

Moko Construction Services in Euless, TX, say, “We converted a large pergola into a water-proof patio cover, reclaiming and incorporating almost all material from the original structure into the new, yielding a beautiful random wood ceiling under new, finished metal roofing.”

Local hardware stores stock patio enclosure kits that include a sloped roof, frame, and multiwall panels. For instance, Palram offers their SanRemo 10 ft. x 14 ft. Patio Enclosure for $4,800–$6,000 to include an aluminum frame, polycarbonate roof panels, acrylic wall panels, lockable sliding doors, and a built-in gutter system. Installation is not offered by the manufacturer, so you will need to hire a contractor to do that.

Gazebo Penguin offers four sizes of what they call an All-Season Solarium, ranging from 8’x12’ to 10’x16’ at prices ranging from $2,650–$3,850. Take note of the snow load capabilities of these kits. Some of them can only hold up to a few inches of snow, and roofs can be instantly destroyed in a bad hail storm.

Based on online reviews of these kits, you really are better off having a contractor build something a bit stronger with weatherproof materials.

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Extend Existing Roof Cost

Consider extending your existing roof so that the patio enclosure appears seamless with the house. There are many variables that go into replicating your existing roof to extend it over the patio that you need to have a contractor visit the home, see what you already have in place, take accurate measurements, and give you a quote. A very general price would be $35/sqft. When asking for quotes, know what style of roof you’d like—sloping, vaulted, flat, etc.

Patio Enclosures

Patio Roof Ceiling Types & Cost

Your new roof’s ceiling will need a covering to compete the look for your patio visitors. The most common is plywood or tongue and groove planks, but you could also drywall it or use the lighter gypsum board. Armstrong Ceilings has some alternatives on offer:

  • Beadboard – Nail sheets of beadboard to the ceiling. It’ll give your ceiling a light cottage look. $2.50–$4.20/sqft (for Armstrong products)
  • Metal – Nail or screw in patterned metal tiles, with options in brass, copper, chrome, white, or lacquered steel. $4–$9 or more/sqft
  • Decorative plaster or tin-look tiles - 12" x 12" mineral fiber tiles. “Apply it directly to the ceiling using Armstrong's Easy Up installation system or adhesive.” $1–$2.50/sqft
  • Wood-look ceiling planks – for a country home feel. $2.50–$4.20/sqft

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Fiberglass Patio Beams Cost

These give the look of a substantial column without becoming a victim of termites or wood rot. They are lightweight, are as easy to work with as regular wood, and have corrosion resistance, high strength, and dimensional stability. Most hardware stores sell them in prices ranging from $60–$370. These columns are structurally designed to bear the weight of a patio’s load.

Patio Enclosure Additions Costs

Solar panels - Add solar panels to the roof to benefit from the sun’s power and lower your utility bill. See our article on solar panels here.

Ceiling accessories - Wire items into the ceiling:

  • Recessed light fixtures $4–$370
  • Hanging light fixtures $14–$5,000
  • Ceiling fans $60–$3,000
  • Heaters $90–$770

Windows - You may want to go all out and install additional support frames and drywall, along with removable windows. You can buy these in glass, acrylic, or plastic, depending on how much heat/cold you want to keep in the enclosure and how much UV protection you want.

Misting system - Wrap a misting system around the roof’s eaves. Complete kits are available that range from $16–$30.

Natural light - A skylight or two with UV ray filters can keep the patio filled with natural light. $30–$1,850

Drainage - Of all the additional options, especially if you live somewhere with heavy rainfall, consider the addition of gutters to direct rainfall away from the patio area. You can buy vinyl gutter kits with everything you need for $220–$590, and your contractor can install them for $60–$90/hour.

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Screened In Patio Costs

Not the same as full walls, screens can block almost everything from crossing your patio space—bugs, leaves, etc. The better kind are firmly attached to your patio frame/beams and can withstand any type of weather, the most common material used being fiberglass mesh. An average 270sqft screened in porch costs approx. $4.50/sqft, which would bring you to a total of $600 (for a small porch with entry level materials) to $3,510 (for a bigger wraparound porch with premium materials).

Screened In Porch

Drapes

Outdoor drapes – set up a curtain rod and hang some heavy curtains you can pull closed for privacy. These curtains are made with long-lasting fabrics suitable for outdoor use.

Custom mesh screen curtains – Tarpsnow.com says, “These curtains are perfect to keep out insects, mosquitoes, pests, debris and personnel, while allowing air flow, lighting and transparency. To complete your installation, we also offer a complete line of Screen Curtain hardware and tracks to meet almost any application.”

Roll shades

These vary in size considerably depending on whether you are mounting them from the eaves or installing them in each space created for them in a wooden patio frame. Also consider if you are mounting them as a surface mount, inside mount, distance mount, or recessed mount and factor in the hardware needed to do that. Also decide if you want them to be opened and closed with a remote control or manually, and if they will not be mounted but zipped to a connection point. Will you have a weatherproof seal between the two? What fabric/material choices do you have in mind?

Hardware store prices range from $13–$35 for a window-sized vinyl blind, $62+ for a custom fit roll up shade, all the way up to $92–$825 for a 96”–132” wide blind in various textures.

Privacy screens

Freestanding or attached screens and panels that can stop the neighbors from looking in. Some side awnings are retractable, and even Walmart sells a brand of them for $100 for a 5.9' x 9.8' screen.

Panels

Fixed panels can give your patio a stunning modern look and come in large sections that you can install between beams or behind fixed seating. An example would be OutDeco decorative screens made from Weathertex, an eco-friendly product that does well in outdoor conditions and comes with a ten-year warranty. Store pickup pricing is approx. $114.99 each for a 2’x4’, and $284.99 each for a 70”x48”.

Mesh screens

Screen kits can be bought from most hardware stores for about $50 and consist of four sections of frame, four corners, and a length of spline. They can accept aluminum, fiberglass mesh, or flexible poly film. A more durable frame is one built with wood and installed by a carpenter. Grooves are available for the mesh panels to drop straight into, and these can be removed and replaced with glass panels in the colder months.

Available Screened In Patio Meshes

  • Copper mesh - $6.50/sqft - Not very strong. Can corrode.
  • Brass mesh - $6/sqft - A bit stronger. Can corrode.
  • Stainless steel mesh - $1/sqft – Strong. Will not rust or tarnish, or be physically damaged from impact.
  • Bronze mesh - $0.85/sqft – Will discolor. Tougher than brass and copper.
  • Vinyl-coated polyester mesh - $0.58/sqft – Strong. Will not corrode.
  • Aluminum mesh - $0.28/sqft – Very strong. Easy to work with.
  • Fiberglass mesh - $0.15/sqft - Easily torn. Fire resistant. Will not rust or corrode.

Some mesh types are better than others. For example, Stoett’s screen mesh is made of a PVC polyester-coated fabric which is 200% stronger and lasts three times longer than fiberglass. Because you have to have Stoett screens installed by a local authorized dealer/installer, prices can vary, but they say a typical job can cost $200 - $15,000, depending on how much screening you need and how many individual pieces need to be custom fit and installed. Available meshes include:

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Patio Enclosure Flooring Costs

Concrete floor - You may be completely happy with your poured concrete patio, but many homeowners prefer to upgrade the look with choices like concrete stenciling or pavers. Average concrete patio costs can vary from $2–$7/sqft depending on your material of choice.

Patio Enclosures

Floating floor - If you’d rather go with a floating wood or tile floor, expect to pay about $5/sqft for the purchase and installation. Be sure to add a moisture barrier between the concrete and your new floor, and fix any damage before you begin. Make sure water drainage is taken care of, or your patio could flood when you enclose it. Read more about hardwood flooring or tile installation on our other cost guide pages.

Radiant Flooring - If you’d love to have a warm patio floor in the colder months, think about installing radiant heating under the floors, in the walls, and in the ceiling. Radiant systems can be installed under most types of flooring.

Water system - Using an open direct, closed, or indirect system, hot water heats the home via tubes connected to a water heater. Install tubing on your existing sub floor.

Electrical system - Heating wires are preinstalled in the underlayment. Products like ThermoFloor can be used with laminate flooring with attached underlayment backing. Sixty square feet of mats of 240V is about $600.

Patio Enclosure Doors Cost

These will go into your framed opening. Choose from either a sliding or hinged patio door. Sample pricing below according to local hardware store prices and 2018 labor costs from around the country:

Patio Door Type Average Cost
Sliding or hinged patio door installation cost
Setting door into existing opening
$200–$260
Sliding/gliding patio doors $330–$5,000
Center hinged doors $1,000–$1,900
French doors $400–$5,000
Pet door $90–$320 installed

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Patio Enclosure Heating & Cooling Costs

Ductless mini split - Consider installing a ductless mini split—a small heating and cooling system with “an outdoor compressor/condenser, and an indoor air-handling unit. A conduit, which houses the power cable, refrigerant tubing, suction tubing, and a condensate drain, links the outdoor and indoor units” (lifestyleremodeling.com). Hardware stores have them priced from $660–$4,500.

Portable unit - An alternative is a portable unit that can vent the air through a window, but some of these can take up a lot of valuable floor space. You’ll need one that’s

  • Less than 8001 BTU for 200sqft or less - $234–$550
  • 8001–14001 BTU for 200sqft or larger - $280–$700

Insulation is a big deal for a fully enclosed patio. Add insulation to your roof and in your drywall, and choose weatherproofed/insulated windows.

Enclosed Patio Features & Costs

Once you have decided on the basic design and features of your enclosed patio, think about what else you would like to have in the new space. Possible additional enhancements to your deck which are not covered in the pricing estimates include the following:

Enclosed Patio Features Average Cost
Portable heaters $100 – $500
Firepit basic $200, custom built $2,700 – $6,000
Outdoor fireplace $1,500 – $6,500
Premanufactured seating $350 – $1,100
Custom seating $2,000 – $5,000
Planter boxes $120 each
Hot tub $3,000 – $14,000
Outdoor shower $800 – $1,000 ($4,000 with privacy enclosure)
Grilling area with sink $1,500 and up
Cover $1,000 manual, $1,700 motorized
Patio furniture Varies
Swing $80–$3,500
Deco panels $15–$150

For some of the above, you’ll need electrical work done to power them. The average hourly cost of a qualified electrician is $30–$70/hour, depending on where you live and how much specialized work you need done. Know ahead of time if your plans will require you to upgrade your power supply—an additional cost.

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Enclosed Patio Foundation Costs

If you don’t already have a poured slab for your patio, expect to pay about $5/sqft for this. Read more about your options on our page Concrete Patio Cost.

Patio Building Permits Costs

If you’re building an enclosure rather than attaching something that’s not permanent, it’s highly likely your local government will have stipulations around its design. Enclosures will need to be a certain distance from other structures, have a limited square footage and height, and have adequate clearance from dividing walls. Your HOA might also have rules around it, so submit your plans to both and wait for permission before you go ahead with construction. If you don’t, the city could make you tear it down if it’s not up to code. Expect to pay around $100–$300 to get the proper permits to build.

Tips for Selecting Your Patio Enclosure Contractor

Before making a final selection, we recommend you have between three to five contractors who appear to match your checklist for the work you want done. Reach out to these contractors to get bids on your project. Contractors will have to come out to your home to measure the patio in order to give you an accurate quote.

Some homeowners with the best experience in hiring a contractor to enclose their patio are able to visit the contractor’s showroom to see all the products and options available. Their initial home visit is also brief and informative, with the contractor answering all the homeowners’ questions knowledgably and offering various options that help the homeowners stay within budget rather than trying to upsell them on a more expensive product they don’t want or need. A good contractor will also follow up after the home visit within 24–48 hours with a design and quote or estimate.

We suggest you look for contractors who fit in as many of the following groups as possible:

  • Licensed contractors
  • Suggest you contact their customers for referrals
  • Have a great portfolio
  • Offer a warranty on labor and materials
  • Are bonded and insured
  • Have an A or A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau and on HomeGuide
  • Have excellent ratings on social media sites
  • Include a clause in the contract that allows you to back out before work starts with a full refund
  • Include setup and complete cleanup costs in the quote
  • Provide excellent communication from your first phone call or e-mail
It can be cheaper to hire your contractor during the winter months when they are not as booked up. Some contractors are happy to provide outside financing too.

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