How much does a DIY spray foam insulation kit cost?
Ashburn, VA

How much does a DIY spray foam insulation kit cost?

Ashburn, VA

How much does a DIY spray foam insulation kit cost?

$0.80 – $1.80cost per board foot
$300 – $500 average medium kit cost (200 board feet)
$700 – $850average large kit cost (600 board feet)

Get free estimates for your project or view our cost guide below:

$0.80 – $1.80 cost per board foot

$300 – $500 average medium kit cost (200 board feet)

$700 – $850 average large kit cost (600 board feet)


Get free estimates for your project or view our cost guide below:
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Tara Farmer
Written by
Tara Farmer
Edited by
Kristen Cramer
Fact-checked by
Tom Grupa

DIY spray foam insulation cost

DIY spray foam insulation costs $0.80 to $1.80 per board foot on average, depending on the foam type, thickness, R-value, and home area being insulated. DIY spray foam insulation kits cost $300 to $850 and covers 200 or 600 board feet.

DIY spray foam insulation cost
Board feet Average total cost Average cost per board foot Type
12 – 15 $40 – $70 $3.30 – $4.60 closed-cell
200 – 250 $300 – $500 $1.50 – $2.00 closed-cell
300 – 450 $400 – $650 $1.33 – $1.44 open-cell
600 – 650 $700 – $850 $1.17 – $1.30 closed-cell
1,000 – 1,350 $750 – $1,200 $0.75 – $0.89 open-cell

  • A board foot is one square foot with 1" thickness.

  • Professional spray foam insulation costs $0.60 to $1.30 per board foot for open-cell spray foam or $1.30 to $2.90 per board foot for closed-cell foam, including installation.

  • In comparison, other types of insulation costs $0.80 to $2.80 per square foot.

DIY spray foam insulation cost - chart
DIY spray foam insulation cost - chart
Get free estimates from spray foam insulation contractors near you.

DIY spray foam insulation kit prices by brand

Most spray foam insulation kits are closed-cell spray foam and come in 200 or 600 board feet (BF) packaging. Some brands offer high-density kits covering fewer board feet with a higher R-value per inch.

DIY spray foam insulation kit prices
Brand Kit price (200 – 250 board feet) Kit price (600 – 650 board feet)
Touch ‘n Foam $360 – $880 $830 – $1,300
Tiger Foam $320 – $450 $640 – $850
Dow Froth-Pak $350 – $600 $750 – $900
Foam It Green $450 – $480 $830 – $880
Handi-Foam $300 – $780 $560 – $880
Touch 'n Seal $280 – $670 $630 – $1,000

  • Open-cell spray foam kits cost $400 to $1,000+ and range from 100 BF to 1,350 BF coverage. Open-cell kits are less common and harder to find.

  • Dow Froth-Pak, Handi-Foam, and Touch 'n Foam offer 12 to 15 BF kits for $40 to $70, suitable for small sealing jobs.

  • Tiger Foam, Dow Froth-Pak, and Foam it Green offer bulk discounts.

Touch ‘n Foam spray foam kit prices

Touch 'n Foam spray foam insulation kits cost $45 to $1,300 and come in small, medium, or large sizes. The small and medium kits house both components in one portable box. Touch 'n Foam also offers one-component spray foam cans for $15 to $20, ideal for sealing small cracks.

Touch ‘n Foam spray foam kit prices
Board feet Price range Uses
15 $45 – $50
  • Touch-ups
  • Hole repairs
200 $360 – $880
  • Basement joist sealing
  • Sill plate sealing
600 $830 – $1,300
  • Wall cavity insulation
  • Attic rafter insulation

Dap Touch ‘n Foam spray foam insulation kit
Dap Touch ‘n Foam spray foam insulation kit

Tiger Foam insulation kit cost

Tiger Foam insulation kits cost $320 to $950, depending on the size and type. Tiger Foam offers closed-cell and open-cell spray foam kit options. The company's newest formula uses hydrofluoroolefin (HFO), an environmentally friendly blowing agent. Tiger Foam offers bulk pricing when purchasing 2 or more kits.

Tiger Foam insulation kit cost
Board feet Price range Kit types
200 $320 – $450 Fast rise
600 $640 – $850 Fast rise, slow rise, and quick cure
1,350 $800 – $950 Open-cell

Dow Froth-Pak spray foam kit cost

Dow Froth-Pak spray foam kits cost $45 to $900 and provide quick-cure, closed-cell spray foam. Froth-Paks come in green-labeled sealant kits or red-labeled insulation kits. Formulations with low global warming potential (GWP) fall at the high end of the price range.

Dow Froth-Pak spray foam kit cost
Board feet Price range Kit types
12 $45 – $50 Sealant
210 $350 – $600 Sealant, insulation
620 $750 – $850 Sealant
650 $830 – $900 Sealant

  • Use sealant kits to seal cracks, gaps, or wall stud perimeters before installing fiberglass or other insulation.

  • Use insulation kits when insulating larger cavities.

Open vs. closed-cell spray foam DIY insulation kit prices

Open-cell spray foam insulation kits cost $400 to $1,200 and cover 300 to 1,350 board feet. Closed-cell kits cost $300 to $850 and cover 200 to 750 board feet.

Open vs. closed-cell spray foam DIY insulation kit prices
Foam type Average kit price Coverage (in board feet)
Closed-cell $300 – $500 200 – 250
Open-cell $400 – $650 300 – 450
Closed-cell $700 – $850 600 – 750
Open-cell $750 – $1,200 1000 – 1,350

  • Open-cell spray foam is cheaper per board foot but has a lower R-value per inch and does not block moisture.

  • Open-cell foam is a better sound barrier than closed-cell foam.

Cost factors for DIY spray foam insulation kits

Most DIY spray foam insulation kits include the foam ingredients, sprayer, hose, and extra nozzles. Protective gear is essential to ensure personal safety during the application. Protecting surrounding surfaces is also critical because spray foam is difficult to remove.

DIY spray foam insulation accessories & prices
Accessory Price range
Hooded suit $10 – $20
Disposable shoe booties $4 – $10
Respirator $15 – $50
Safety goggles $5 – $30
Gloves $2 – $8
Gun and hose assemblies (9 – 15 feet) $70 – $120
Infrared thermometer $20 – $50
Ladder $80 – $300
Moisture meter $20 – $60
Plastic sheeting and tape $5 – $30
Replacement nozzle tips (25-pack) $35 – $50
Staple gun $15 – $40
Tape $3 – $10

Factors affecting the cost of DIY spray foam insulation include:

Get free estimates from spray foam insulation contractors near you.
  • Foam type – Open-cell spray foam is cheaper and has a higher expansion rate than closed-cell foam. Still, open-cell foam does not provide a moisture barrier or improve structural integrity.

  • Thickness / R-value – The higher the desired R-value, the more inches of foam are required.

  • Prep work – Spray foam insulation requires a clean and dry surface. Cover the floor and surrounding areas to protect from overspray. Attic prep work may involve covering vents and recessed light canisters.

  • Old insulation removal – Hiring a professional to remove and dispose of old insulation costs $1 to $2 per square foot. The cost to remove insulation DIY depends on the insulation type, amount, and local disposal fees.

  • Backup supplies – Spray hoses and guns clog easily. Confirm you have extras on hand before starting the project.

DIY spray foam FAQs

Can you spray foam insulation yourself?

You can DIY spray foam insulation, but hiring a professional is best for large jobs. Spray foam insulation involves mixing dangerous chemicals. The mixture ratio, surface temperature, air temperature, and spray pressure must be precise for a safe and successful application.

Some insulation companies only sell or warranty spray foam products to certified technicians.

DIY spray foam insulation pros and cons
Pros Cons
  • Effective insulator, when installed correctly
  • May save on labor costs
  • One-component spray foam cans are DIY-friendly for air sealing small gaps or insulating small surfaces.
  • Steep learning curve for proper application
  • May off-gas harmful chemicals if installed incorrectly
  • May aggravate skin or respiratory issues
  • More expensive than other insulation types
  • Must vacate the insulated area until the product cures
  • Most spray foams require a thermal barrier.

How much spray foam insulation do I need?

The spray foam insulation amount needed depends on the foam type, the home's geographical location, and the part of the home insulated. Energy Star recommends an R-30 to R-60 R-value in attics and R-13 to R-21 in walls, depending on the climate zone. Homes in cold climates require thicker insulation.

Open-cell foam has a lower R-value per inch than closed-cell foam. This lower R-value means you need more inches of open-cell foam to achieve the same total R-value as closed-cell foam. Spray foam is measured in "board feet." One board foot is 1 square foot of 1" thick foam.

To determine how much spray foam you need:

  1. Multiply the length x the width of each surface to get its square footage.

  2. Add the square footage of all surfaces to be insulated to get the total square footage.

  3. Multiply the total square footage x the inch thickness desired to get the total board feet.

Is DIY spray foam worth it?

DIY spray foam is worth it to seal small gaps, holes, and areas of air infiltration affecting the home's energy efficiency. Large jobs may cost as much to DIY as for professional installation. Hiring a pro is often the better choice due to the dangers of DIY spray foaming incorrectly.

What is the best DIY spray foam insulation?

The best DIY spray foam insulation depends on the part of the home insulated.

Slow-rise spray foam is best for existing wall cavities to avoid removing all the drywall.

Fast-rise spray foam is best for new construction, open wall cavities, attics, and crawl spaces.

Open-cell spray foam is best for sound dampening.

Where to use spray foam insulation kits?

Use spray foam insulation kits to insulate small areas that need air sealing and insulation, such as floors, walls, crawl spaces, rim joists, ceilings, and attics. Consider the area size and the insulation thickness required. Most spray foam insulation kits cover 200 to 600 square feet with 1" thickness.

  • Use open-cell foam to dampen sound in walls.

  • Use closed-cell foam for crawl spaces and other areas needing insulation and a moisture barrier.

Where to buy spray foam insulation kits?

Spray foam insulation kits are available at local hardware stores and online retailers. Some spray foam insulation manufacturers like Tiger Foam and Foam it Green sell kits directly through their websites.

Getting estimates from spray foam installers

Hiring a professional to install spray foam insulation may cost more than doing it yourself. Still, professional insulation typically includes a warranty and guaranteed safe and effective application.

Before hiring insulation contractors:

  • Get at least three quotes to compare.

  • Ask for a detailed quote, including areas to be insulated, estimated R-value, insulation depth or thickness, and spray foam brand and type.

  • Ask for a foam removal guarantee in the event of incorrect installation.

  • Look for certified spray foam insulation professionals.

  • Browse their reviews on HomeGuide and Google.

  • Select insured and bonded companies that have been in business for more than five years.

  • Ask for references.

  • Avoid selecting the lowest quote as quality may suffer.

  • Get a detailed estimate, contract, and warranty in writing before the work begins.

  • Never pay in full before the project starts. Use a payment plan instead for work completed.

Questions to ask

  • Are you licensed, bonded, and insured?

  • How long have you been in business?

  • What experience do you have with spray foam insulation?

  • Will you subcontract the work?

  • Is spray foam the best insulation for my space? Why or why not?

  • Do you recommend open-cell or closed-cell insulation for my space, and why?

  • How long does the insulation take to cure, and when can we safely re-enter the house?

  • Do you use a machine that automatically shuts off if the spray foam formula ratios are incorrect?

  • Does the quote include removing damaged or old insulation?

  • What is and is not included in the price?

  • What additional costs should I expect?

  • Do you offer financing options?

  • Do you offer a whole-house discount?

  • How long will the project take?

  • How long should the insulation last?

  • Is there a warranty, and if so, what does it include?

  • Are there rebates available, and do you apply for them?