Brad Weesner Design

Brad Weesner Design

Brad Weesner

Baltimore, MD

5.0

Responds within hours
12 years in business
5 employees

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Our many years of work with Architects, Builders and trade craftsmen, allow us to work of full scope projects such as starting to build your home, in addition to providing room decoration, ideas, and other design features for your home. 

We are interested in finding your style, and your personality in creating liveable and beautiful spaces for you. 

Company founded in 2005 - we are located at www.bradweesnerdesign.com 

The ability to work with our Clients, with such great relationships is the most important aspect of my work.  I love creating beautiful environments, but more to the point - bringing beauty to your world.  

Also the wide range of projects we are fortunate to be part of - from a powder room up to being involved at the beginning of a custom built home - Hotels, restaurants, Equestrian Barns, Historic Theaters, all provide creative satisfaction. 

Services

Interior Design, Curtain Installation, Curtain Repair, Kitchen Designers, Muralist, Picture Hanging And Art Installation, Wallpaper Installation


Location

Baltimore, MD 21201

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Q & A

What is your typical process for working with a new customer?

 We meet at your space or ours

We discuss your goals, time frame, budget and other details

We share how and where we could be of help

We agree to work together

Space measurements and site details are taken

Space planning, drawings are created with furnishings, fabrics and other details

We show 3 versions of your space to consider

With your feedback, we narrow down and make final selections

Orders are created for your approval, and placed with vendors

Upon all item's arrival, we handle the installation!  


What education and/or training do you have that relates to your work?

My earlier roles with Ritz Carlton Hotels, Luxury property managment, Luxury Home building all gave me many opportunites to create new spaces, and handle the design and fit out of Lobbies, Dining Rooms, and working with builders to create single family homes.  

I have 11 years of experience with my firm, Brad Weesner Design.


Do you have a standard pricing system for your services? If so, please share the details here.

My rate is $175 per hour, if we choose an hourly rate structure.  Most people do not do this, and we work out a fair "flat rate" for the design hours involved with your project.  

The first consultation is anywhere from $150 to $250 depending on the location visited, and from there, we work carefully to stay within your budget, and create a plan that is fair and workable for each of us. 


How did you get started teaching?

I received a phone call from the Dean of Harford Community College, and was hired!    

My class has been Introduction to Interior Design, for a class of approximately 22 students.  It's great to be able to inform, inspire and influence new designers getting started.  


What types of customers have you worked with?

Our Clients that seem to be happiest usually come to the table with an understanding of the process, and have a real interest in getting good design.    They seem to have an idea of the look they would like, and take the time for the early parts of the process that are less fun than the choosing of fabrics and things.  

Our best Clients fully read our agreement, and ask questions,  and understand our process before we get started - and most of all our very best Clients are totally honest with things such as;  feedback on design ideas, the scope of their budget, expectations of time, and most of all being open with me to allow me to "find" their own style.   


Describe a recent event you are fond of.

Christmas in New England.  Each year, going home - and the small towns, all with a Norman Rockwell feeling - all the wreaths, garlands, everything is real and authentic.  The small sled propped up on a door, the trio of wreaths on the next door, and small carriage barns with doors open with a great tree just inside as part of the property's overall look.  

The snow, the fireplaces, American Flags, and many, many homes all decorated in a way that has no blow up santas and motorized sparkle light demonstrations.  Just really tasteful, relaxing, classic and very, very pretty.  


What advice would you give a customer looking to hire a pro in your area of expertise?

Spend as much time looking at the following things as you do looking at room ideas you like;

* How much and How little do you want to accomplish?

* What is the difference between and Interior Designer and an Interior Decorator, and does this matter to you? 

* How much control do you wish to have, and How much can you share?

* What do things cost these days, and why?  What makes a quality item, versus a "just for now" item?

* What kind of relationship do you wish to have with your decorator or designer?  

* Know that you should hire someone way earlier than you might imagine.  There is a lot of work we do on the front end before we really get into picking out paint colors.  (Hint: paint colors normally come later in the process after choosing more specific things like rugs, fabrics and things!) 

* Understand that involving friends and relatives in the design process may feel like support to you, but it can be challenging to the forward movement of the best design for you.  Think about your tendancy to do this, and advise the designer up front, and include this person from the beginning to be of most help.   Showing someone our "final" design choice with no background or context is usually not successful.

* Read the agreement.  It spells out everything you must do, and everything the designer must do.  My happiest Clients have questions that show me they have read the agreement, and shows early on they are involved in more than a casual way. 


What questions should customers think through before talking to pros about their needs?

* Do you want to hire someone to give you "their look", do you like the work you see on their images?

* Do you want to hire someone that will help find "your look" and understand their images are other peoples' looks.

* What is the overall budget, and if there is "stretch" with the budget, please be prepared to share this.  We have things that are more affordable, and things covered in 22K gold leaf. Until we know your budget, it's hard to get started.

* What time frame do you wish to have things completed?  There are choices that can be made for faster delivery, and there are choices that might be better, but take longer. 

* When discussing your project, We can help provide a framework around your ideas - suggesting price points, time frames and options that may / may not enlarge the scope of your first thoughts.  Be prepared to ask what/how much things would enlarge and what impact that would be. 

* To ask the designer what styles they prefer, what styles they are comfortable to work with and what styles are they not as comfortable to work with.  A better designer should be able to answer these with different answers, showing you examples of work they created more of their own voice, and spaces that were more about capturing the Client's personality. 

* Ask them their strengths and weaknesses.  It's an interview with someone you might hire, and this is a regular question you should be comfortable to ask someone who you (should) have a good long relationship with! 

* Ask them for more questions from their side - what questions would they have of you.  Encourage the open dialogue, and encourage the free exchange of back and forth ideas and opinions.  This sets the tone for your entire working relationship - Honesty. 

* In larger projects, where you wish to have professionals working together, It is most helpful to have a good designer by your side from the beginning. Waiting until the Architect has already designed the home, and placed windows, HVAC vents and things creates a bigger challenge for a designer to place built ins,  float furniture, etc. Think about if and where floor outlets might be desired so as to avoid extention cords where you will float furniture in a room.